Childhood Apraxia of Speech Treatment Ideas for Preschoolers

Updated: May 3


Another blog post focusing on treatment for Apraxia of Speech! You can use these lesson plans during your Apraxia of Speech treatment sessions with your early intervention kiddos, toddlers, preschoolers, and kindergarten students!


I have chosen some of my most commonly targeted words in Apraxia of Speech therapy to feature in the lesson plans (Make sure you check out the other blog posts!). Of course, you need to use your clinical discretion when choosing goals for your student. Remember - this is just an example of how you can take target words and incorporate them into play!


To make sure we get lots of trials of each word, I choose 3-5 words for the session. We start off by pre-practicing and I really focus on TEACHING the motor plan. Then, we move into play activities that naturally incorporate the target words.



Materials:

* Is that your poo?: Repetitive and Interactive Story. It's a FREEBIE in my TPT store!

* Playdough

* Poo shaped fillables (available at Dollarama)

* Early Word Shape Apraxia Drill Cards

Target Words:

* CV Words: Poo, My, Who, You






You can start off by reading this FREE silly and playful story, Is that your Poo?,about a little blue bird who is trying to find out who is leaving poo everywhere! On each each page, the character denies leaving the poo. You can target prosody by saying the repetitive phrase, "When I poo, I poo blue), using the different character voices! You can modify the phrase to the level of your student.

Each page also features the words poo, you, my, and who, so it is really easy to get a lot of productions.


Once you're done reading the story, you can use a "hands on" activity and make poo out of Playdough (don't knock it until you try it - kids think poo is hilarious. It's completely developmentally normal!).


Now onto my favorite Dollarama find - poop fillables! They offer a 💩 load of opportunities for practice!


You can fill the poos with mini objects and then hide them around the room. Cue the child to say "poo" each